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Wednesday, February 5, 2020 | History

1 edition of Caesar"s Commentaries on the Gallic war found in the catalog.

Caesar"s Commentaries on the Gallic war

Gaius Julius Caesar

Caesar"s Commentaries on the Gallic war

and the first book of the Greek paraphrase

by Gaius Julius Caesar

  • 328 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Harper & brothers in New-York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsAnthon, Charles, 1797-1867, ed
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA6235 .A7 1838
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, [2], 493 p.
    Number of Pages493
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25524758M
    LC Control Number41036074

    Vibullius, as soon as the alarm, which Caesar's unexpected arrival had raised, was over, began again to deliver Caesar's message in the presence of Libo, Lucius Lucceius, and Theophanes, to whom Pompey used to communicate his most confidential secrets. When he found that they did not even then come out [from their intrenchments,] he led back his army into camp about noon. Their plan was cleverly executed in this way: first they attacked from all directions, then moved in among troops of cavalry and dismounted while the charioteers moved back from the immediate combat area and waited to assist troops which found themselves in difficulty. The following year, the farmers and soldiers exchange places; in this way, there is never any shortage of either farmers or soldiers.

    The people of Genabum came forth silently from the city before midnight, and began to cross the river. Caesar realizes, upon the war's renewal, that the Britons can easily retreat; the Roman cavalry is still in Gaul. A wall thrown around it makes a citadel of this [mountain], and connects it with the town. With his cavalry and their supplies, he begins the march. The principal event in this book is Caesar's excursion to Britain. Book II covers the events of a year later, 57 B.

    In these things, principally, Fusius was employed. The method of battle in which the Germans had practiced themselves was this. He [Caesar] makes inquiries on the same points privately of others, and discovered that it is all true; that "Dumnorix is the person, a man of the highest daring, in great favor with the people on account of his liberality, a man eager for a revolution: that for a great many years he has been in the habit of contracting for the customs and all the other taxes of the Aedui at a small cost, because when he bids, no one dares to bid against him. Moreover, their land is not privately owned. Caesar, to confine Pompey within as narrow a compass as possible; Pompey, to occupy as many hills as he could in as large a circuit as possible, and several skirmishes were fought in consequence of it. This camp joined a certain wood, and was not above four hundred paces distant from the sea.


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Caesars Commentaries on the Gallic war book

Therefore nobody was found so unreasonable as to make such demands. The report is quickly spread among all the states of Gaul; for, whenever a more important and remarkable event takes place, they transmit the intelligence through their lands and districts by a shout; the others take it up in succession, and pass it to their neighbors, as happened on this occasion; for the things which were done at Genabum at sunrise, were heard in the territories of the Arverni before the end of the first watch, which is an extent of more than a hundred and sixty miles.

There is a debate concerning Avaricum in the general council, whether they should decide, that it should be burned or defended. Besides these, he expected two legions from Syria, with Scipio; from Crete, Lacedaemon, Pontus, Syria, and other states, he got about three thousand archers, six cohorts of slingers, two thousand mercenary soldiers, and seven thousand horse; six hundred of which, Deiotarus had brought from Gaul; Ariobarzanes, five hundred from Cappadocia.

But as soon as Caesar had landed his troops, he set off the same day for Oricum: when he arrived there, Lucius Torquatus, who was governor of the town by Pompey's appointment, and had a garrison of Parthinians in it, endeavored to shut the gates and defend the town, and ordered the Greeks to man the walls, and to take arms.

Moreover, [as for] Ariovistus, no sooner did he defeat the forces of the Gauls in a battle which took place at Magetobria, than [he began] to lord it haughtily and cruelly, to demand as hostages the children of all the principal nobles, and wreak on them every kind of cruelty, if every thing was not done at his nod or pleasure; that he was a savage, passionate, and reckless man, and that his commands could no longer be borne.

At the same time the Ambarri, the friends and kinsmen of the Aedui, apprize Caesar, that it was not easy for them, now that their fields had been devastated, to ward off the violence of the enemy from their towns: the Allobroges likewise, who had villages and possessions on the other side of the Rhone, betake themselves in flight to Caesar, and assure him that they had nothing remaining, except the soil of their land.

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These had a dispute with each other for precedence, and in the struggle between the magistrates they had contended with their utmost efforts, the one for Convictolitanis, the other for Cotus.

He drew up his soldiers in a secret position within the vineae, and exhorts them to reap, at least, the harvest of victory proportionate to their exertions.

Word was brought back, that it was easy. Caesar, as he perceived that the enemy were superior in cavalry, and he himself could receive no aid from the Province or Italy, while all communication was cut off, sends across the Rhine into Germany to those states which he had subdued in the preceding campaigns, and summons from them cavalry and the light-armed infantry, who were accustomed to engage among them.

When Scipio perceived the eagerness and alacrity of our troops to engage, suspecting that he should be obliged the next day, either to fight, against his inclination, or to incur great disgrace by keeping within his camp, though he had come with high expectation, yet by advancing rashly, made a shameful end; and at night crossed the river, without even giving the signal for breaking up the camp, and returned to the ground from which he came, and there encamped near the river, on an elevated situation.

By these means, the troops which were lost at Avaricum are speedily replaced. The Helvetii, either because they thought that the Romans, struck with terror, were retreating from them, the more so, as the day before, though they had seized on the higher grounds, they had not joined battle or because they flattered themselves that they might be cut of from the provisions, altering their plan and changing their route, began to pursue, and to annoy our men in the rear.

For though he saw that an engagement with the cavalry would be without any danger to his chosen legion, yet he did not think proper to engage, lest, after the enemy were routed, it might be said that they had been insnared by him under the sanction of a conference. But when Caesar perceived that they had proposed the conference merely to avoid present danger and distress, but that they offered no hopes or terms of peace, he applied his thoughts to the prosecution of the war.

For they were often told by deserters, that they could scarcely maintain their horses, and that their other cattle was dead: that they themselves were not in good health from their confinement within so narrow a compass, from the noisome smell, the number of carcasses, and the constant fatigue to them, being men unaccustomed to work, and laboring under a great want of water.

Report of these events is rapidly borne into Transalpine Gaul. Officers were appointed to collect it, not only in the cities, but in almost every village and fort: and whosoever of them acted with the greatest rigor and inhumanity, was esteemed the best man, and best citizen.

He himself, in turn, taking hold of them one by one drew them up to the wall. And Noviodunum. This he did, chiefly, on this account, because he was unwilling that the country, from which the Helvetii had departed, should be untenanted, lest the Germans, who dwell on the other side of the Rhine, should, on account of the excellence of the lands, cross over from their own territories into those of the Helvetii, and become borderers upon the province of Gaul and the Allobroges.

The Helvetii, disappointed in this hope, tried if they could force a passage some by means of a bridge of boats and numerous rafts constructed for the purpose; others, by the fords of the Rhone, where the depth of the river was least, sometimes by day, but more frequently by nightbut being kept at bay by the strength of our works, and by the concourse of the soldiers, and by the missiles, they desisted from this attempt.Jan 17,  · In the first 10 minutes I provide 5 Campaign/Battle Maps which are directly related to the events in Book 1 (58 B.C.).

However they are in no specific order. The Gallic Wars: Book 1 of 8. Chapter Gallia est omnis dīvīsa in partēs trēs, quārum ūnam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquītānī, tertiam quī ipsōrum linguā Celtae, nostrā Gallī appellantur. Hī omnēs linguā, īnstitūtīs, lēgibus inter sē differunt.

Nov 19,  · Buy Caesar's Commentaries: On The Gallic War and On The Civil War by Julius Caesar (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on /5(2).

Oct 01,  · Caesars Commentaries The Gallic Civil book written by Julius Caesar relesead on and published by El Paso Norte Press.

This is one of the best Rome book that contains pages, you can find and read book online or download with ISBN /5(). The Gallic Wars were a series of military campaigns waged by the Roman proconsul Julius Caesar against several Gallic sylvaindez.com's war against the Gallic tribes lasted from 58 BC to 50 BC and culminated in the decisive Battle of Alesia in 52 BC, in which a complete Roman victory resulted in the expansion of the Roman Republic over the whole of Gaul (mainly present-day France and Belgium).Location: Gaul (present-day France, Luxembourg.

Sep 28,  · Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War; and the First Book of the Greek Paraphrase; with English Notes, Critical and Explanatory, Plans of Battles, S by Julius Caesar. Paperback This comprehensive English book provides lessons and exercises for a wide range of students, including young primary pupils in Grades 3 and 4, upper Pages: